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Daniel Leslie Brandt (born circa 1947 to missionary parents in China[1]) is an American activist[2][3][4] on the World Wide Web, particularly in relation to Google Inc. and the Wikipedia encyclopedia project. Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (WWW or simply the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents that runs over the Internet. ... Google, Inc. ... Wikipedia is a multilingual, Web-based, free-content encyclopedia project. ...


Brandt's current activism centers on demands for accountability from organizations he believes are operating irresponsibly, or in an unnecessarily secretive manner.[5] In 1989, Brandt and Steve Badrich co-founded a non-profit organization called Public Information Research (PIR). Brandt launched Google Watch in 2002, a website stating his criticism of the Google search engine, and Wikipedia Watch in 2005, a similar site detailing his opinion that the Wikipedia encyclopedia lacks accountability and accuracy. Brandt also works as a book indexer based in San Antonio, Texas.[6] Accountability is a concept in ethics with several meanings. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A nonprofit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support some issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes. ... Public Information Research, Inc. ... Google Watch is a website run by Public Information Research, started in 2002 by Daniel Brandt. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, typically common to a particular domain name or subdomain on the World Wide Web on the Internet. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An index is a detailed list, usually arranged alphabetically, of the specific information in a publication, whether a book, periodical, database or multimedia collection. ... Nickname: Alamo City; River City Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Bexar County Mayor Phil Hardberger Area - City 1067. ... Contents

   * 1 Student activism
   * 2 Political activism
   * 3 Online activism
         o 3.1 Government cookies
         o 3.2 Criticism of Google and Yahoo!
         o 3.3 Criticism of Wikipedia
         o 3.4 Seigenthaler Wikipedia biography controversy
   * 4 References
   * 5 Bibliography
   * 6 External links
         o 6.1 Sites run by Daniel Brandt
         o 6.2 Media coverage

Student activism

In his college years he was an anti–Vietnam War activist while at the University of Southern California (USC). According to the Daily Trojan, Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Students occupying Sheffield town hall over the introduction of higher education fees Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. ... The University of Southern California (commonly referred to as USC, SC, Southern California, and incorrectly as Southern Cal[1]), located in the University Park neighborhood in Los Angeles, California, USA, was founded in 1880, making it Californias oldest private research university. ... The Daily Trojan is the official student newspaper of the University of Southern California. ...

   "Brandt was the editor and creator of Prevert, a monthly student activist newspaper, and the de facto leader of the student activist movement at this university in the late '60's."[7]

On October 4, 1968, he was one of three members of Students for a Democratic Society who burned what they said were their draft cards in front of television cameras following a speech by Senator Edmund Muskie at USC.[8] Students occupying Sheffield town hall over the introduction of higher education fees Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... SDS Button Logo The Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was, historically, a student activist movement in the United States that was one of the main iconic representations of the countrys New Left. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ...


When Brandt's student deferment classification was withdrawn by the local Selective Service System in December 1968 due to his public non-cooperation with his draft board, Brandt was convicted of failure to report for a pre-induction physical exam and refusal to submit to induction. Brandt appealed and his convictions were reversed on the grounds that he was entitled to student status as an undergraduate at USC.[9] Since President Carter granted amnesty to all draft resisters in 1977, this would have the effect of overturning this conviction even if it had not already been reversed, with the further implication that all civil rights have been restored despite the conviction.[10] The Selective Service System is the means by which the United States administers military conscription. ... In medicine, the physical examination or clinical examination is the process by which the physician investigates the body of a patient for signs of disease. ... It has been suggested that Mandate (law) be merged into this article or section. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ...


Political activism

Brandt states that during the 1980s, when living in Arlington, Virginia, he introduced a number of political activists and researchers to computing and how to work with databases, including former Central Intelligence Agency officers Philip Agee[11] and Ralph McGehee, as well as John F. Kennedy assassination researchers Bernard Fensterwald and Mary Ferrell.[12] Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... Philip Burnett Franklin Agee (born July 19, 1935 in Tacoma Park, Florida) is a former CIA agent and author who published a controversial book, Inside the Company: CIA Diary, detailing his experiences in, and the operation of, the eponymous agency. ... Ralph McGehee is a self-described twenty-five year decorated veteran of the CIA and a critic. He is the creator of the CIABASE computer database. ... For other persons named John Kennedy, see John Kennedy (disambiguation). ... Bernard Bud Fensterwald Jr. ... Mary Elizabeth McHughes Ferrell (26 October 1922—20 February 2004) was an American historian and conspiracy theorist who created a large database on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. ...


From the 1960s onwards, Brandt collected clippings and citations pertaining to influential people and intelligence matters. In the 1980s, through his company Micro Associates, he sold a database of citations of these clippings, books, government reports, and other publications. He told the New York Times that "many of these sources are fairly obscure so it's a very effective way to retrieve information on U.S. intelligence that no one else indexes."[13] Clipping is the cutting-out of articles from a paper publication. ... A citation is a credit or reference to another document or source which documents both influence and authority. ... Intelligence (abbreviated or ) is the process and the result of gathering information and analyzing it to answer questions or obtain advance warnings needed to plan for the future. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


These prior efforts were the basis of his NameBase website, described as "a quirky index of names cross-indexed," focusing on "foreign policy, spy, conspiracy, media, etc."[14] Currently the names are drawn from over 800 books, serials, and other publications.[15]


Between 1990 and 1992, three members of Brandt's Public Information Research (PIR) advisory board, including Chip Berlet, resigned over a dispute concerning another board member, L. Fletcher Prouty, and the republishing of Prouty's book The Secret Team.[16] Chip Berlet. ... Leroy Fletcher Prouty (January 24, 1917 - June 5, 2001) was a commissioned officer in the United States Air Force, author, banker, and critic of US foreign policy, especially as regarded the activities of the CIA. His books include The Secret Team: The CIA and Its Allies in Control of the... The Secret Team: The CIA and Its Allies in Control of the United States and the World is a book by L. Fletcher Prouty, a former colonel in the US Air Force, first published in 1973. ...


Online activism

Government cookies

In March 2002, Brandt was credited with finding persistent HTTP cookies on one of the Central Intelligence Agency's websites that could be used to track users for approximately 10 years, in contravention of federal government rules.[17][18] On December 25, 2005, Brandt found that the National Security Agency's website was using two HTTP cookies set to expire in 2035. Brandt contacted the NSA to remind them they were in violation of federal rules and the cookies were removed. The event gained international publicity.[3][4] HTTP cookies, sometimes known as web cookies or just cookies, are parcels of text sent by a server to a web browser and then sent back unchanged by the browser each time it accesses that server. ... Obverse of the Great Seal of the United States. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining for the year. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Security Agency/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS) is the U.S. governments cryptologic organization. ...


Criticism of Google and Yahoo!

   Main article: Google Watch

In 2002, Brandt launched the website Google Watch through PIR, reportedly in response to Google's low ranking of deep content within NameBase.org, which is placed far below competing information.[19] Google Watch is a website run by Public Information Research, started in 2002 by Daniel Brandt. ... Google Watch is a website run by Public Information Research, started in 2002 by Daniel Brandt. ...


Google Watch documents Brandt's views on privacy, long-living HTTP cookies, and advertising policies within Google and Gmail. Brandt has also described the issue of "made for AdSense pages" — spam pages with content often scraped from other sites that sometimes enjoy high rankings in search engines due to optimization techniques. In addition, PIR has released Scroogle, a screen-scraping proxy that circumvents Google's tracking of user activity via HTTP cookies. Some writers have criticised the Google Watch website, such as writer Farhad Manjoo, who stated: Gmail, officially Google Mail in the United Kingdom and Germany, is a free webmail and POP3 e-mail service provided by Google. ... AdSense is an ad serving program run by Google. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Google search is the worlds most popular search engine. ... Search engine optimization (SEO) is a subset of search engine marketing, and deals with improving the number and/or quality of visitors to a web site from natural (aka organic or algorithmic search engine) listings. ... Scroogle is an alternative usage mechanism of the Google search engine that disables some of the Google tendencies to store information and disables Googles ads. ... Farhad Manjoo (born 1978) is a staff writer for Salon. ...

   "For people who love Google and who feel that they can't live without it -- for the vast majority of us, that is -- Daniel Brandt's arguments seem absurd. Because he has a personal stake in the squabble, he's pretty easy to dismiss: He doesn't like his Google rank, so it's not surprising he doesn't like Google."[19]

In addition to Brandt's PIR, other privacy and civil rights organisations including the Australian Privacy Foundation, Consumer Federation of America, and Katherine Albrecht's CASPIAN, have endorsed an open letter drafted by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse and the World Privacy Forum requesting that Google suspend their Gmail service on account of privacy concerns, such as "the unlimited period for data retention that Google’s current policies allow."[20] The Australian Privacy Foundation is a NGO formed for the purpose of protecting the privacy rights of Australians. ... The Consumer Federation of America is a non-profit organization founded in 1968. ... Katherine Albrecht is a Harvard doctoral candidate and the founder of CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering), a national consumer organization created in 1999 to educate consumer-citizens about shopper surveillance. ... For Caspian Sea, go to: Caspian Sea CASPIAN Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN) is a national grass-roots consumer group dedicated to fighting supermarket loyalty or frequent shopper cards. ... Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) is an American 501(c)(3) non-profit organization devoted to upholding the right to privacy and protect consumers against identity theft and other privacy crimes. ...


Brandt also maintains an anti-Yahoo! website, Yahoo! Watch. His principal complaint is that the Yahoo! feature Site Match embeds paid links into the main index and search results. Yahoo! - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Yahoo! Search Marketing (formerly Overture Services, Inc. ...


Criticism of Wikipedia

Brandt launched the Wikipedia Watch website through PIR on October 13, 2005,[21] in response to a user authoring a biographical article on him within the Wikipedia peer-edited online encyclopedia project. He has published some logs from Wikipedia Internet Relay Chat channels on Wikipedia Watch,[22] and has listed dozens of examples of plagiarism by Wikipedia editors on the English portal.[23] Several PIR domains have been placed on Wikipedia's spam blacklist.[24] On the Wikipedia Watch website, Brandt advances his view that a website whose content is copied as widely as that of Wikipedia should have higher standards of accountability, and that members of the public who contribute or edit articles should make their identities public for this reason; this includes the facilitation of article subjects bringing litigation against editors, although since this multiple wikis now have articles about him. Brandt considers Wikipedia to be a privacy risk, and stated, "It [Wikipedia] needs to be watched closely." Brandt's view is that the creation of biographical articles on Wikipedia is broadly unacceptable due to the inaccuracy of information included and a lack of accountability.[25] October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia is a multilingual, Web-based, free-content encyclopedia project. ... IRC redirects here. ...


Since November 19, 2005, the Wikipedia Watch site has included a page stating personal details allegedly pertaining to individual Wikipedia editors and administrators who have edited Brandt's biography or responded to his complaints, to November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

   "discourage irresponsible editors from applying for adminship, and encourage others to be more considerate of those who would rather not have an article about themselves."

Brandt states that his reasoning for maintaining the list is that, "if I ever decide that I have cause to sue, I'm not sure who should be sued." This is, according to Brandt, due to a lack of any party within the project claiming content responsibility.[26]


Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales responded to Brandt in a letter to Editor & Publisher, stating, Jimmy Donal Jimbo Wales (born 1966 in Huntsville, Alabama) is a founder of Wikipedia and a member and Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Trustees of the Wikimedia Foundation,[3][4] a non-profit corporation that operates Wikipedia and several other wiki projects, including Wiktionary and Wikinews. ... E&P redirects here. ...

   "I don't regard him as a valid source about anything at all, based on my interactions with him. I tried very hard to help him, and he misrepresented nearly everything about our conversation in his very strange rant. He considers the very existence of a Wikipedia article about him to be a privacy violation, despite being a public person. I find it hard to take him very seriously at all. He misrepresents everything about our procedures, claiming that we have a 'secret police' and so on."[27]

A sidebar on Brandt's site contradicts this letter: "Wales never tried to help Brandt at all, and he and Brandt have never had a conversation."[28] Invasion of privacy is a legal term essentially defined as a violation of the right to be left alone. ... Public figure is a legal term applied in the context of defamation actions (libel and slander). ... // Secret police (sometimes political police) are a police organization which operates in secrecy for the national purpose of maintaining national security against internal threats to the state. ...


In November 2006, the Associated Press reported Brandt's claim to have uncovered 142 "examples of suspected plagiarism" among the 12,000 Wikipedia articles he searched to illustrate the need for "Wikipedia to conduct a thorough review of all its articles." According to the report "Wikipedia editors have been reviewing the 142 articles in question and have declared a handful to be OK because copied passages came from the public domain. Editors found others where Wikipedia appeared to be the one plagiarized. But editors found extensive problems in several cases, with many still not yet fully checked."[29] The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Plagiarism, the activity, denoted by the verb, plagiarise, is claiming anothers writing as ones own. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


Seigenthaler Wikipedia biography controversy

   Main article: John Seigenthaler Sr. Wikipedia biography controversy

In May 2005, an anonymous editor added defamatory information to the John Seigenthaler Sr. Wikipedia biography. In December 2005, Seigenthaler criticized his Wikipedia biography in a USA Today column that generated considerable publicity.[30] John Seigenthaler Sr. ... Libel redirects here. ... Press photo of Seigenthaler John Lawrence Seigenthaler (pronounced , born July 27, 1927) is an American journalist, writer, and political figure. ... USA Today is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ...


Brandt found that the IP address used by the editor was also used to host a website, with the text, "Welcome to Rush Delivery." Brandt contacted a company in Nashville, Tennessee, known by that name, and the IP address on the email they sent back to Brandt matched that in the edit history of the Seigenthaler article. Within the week, Brian Chase, a manager at Rush Delivery, resigned and personally confessed to Seigenthaler.[31] An IP address (Internet Protocol address) is a unique address that devices use in order to identify and communicate with each other on a computer network utilizing the Internet Protocol standard (IP)—in simpler terms, a computer address. ... Nickname: Music City Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area - City 526. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area Ranked 36th - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²) - Width 120 miles (195 km) - Length 440 miles (710 km) - % water 2. ...


References

  1. ^ Chasnoff, Brian (December 11, 2005). S.A. man is chasing the secret authors of Wikipedia. San Antonio Express-News
  2. ^ Jesdanun, Anick (December 28, 2005). NSA Web Site Puts 'Cookies' on Computers. Associated Press
  3. ^ a b Goldenberg, Suzanne (December 30, 2005) US intelligence service bugged website visitors despite ban. The Guardian
  4. ^ a b Velshi, Ali (December 29, 2005). "New Information About NSA Domestic Spying Program Emerges", The Situation Room, CNN
  5. ^ Thatcher, Gary (July 31, 1989). Cloak-and-Dagger Database: Software Sniffs Out Secret Agents. The Christian Science Monitor p. 8.
  6. ^ Seelye, Katharine Q. (December 11, 2005) A Little Sleuthing Unmasks Writer of Wikipedia Prank. New York Times
  7. ^ Daily Trojan, January 12, 1971.
  8. ^ Kneeland, Douglas E. (October 5, 1968). Muskie Urged Raid Halt; Muskie Confirms He Appealed To Johnson to Halt the Bombing. The New York Times
  9. ^ United States v. Brandt, 435 F.2d 324 (9th Cir. 1970).
 10. ^ Proclamation 4483 -- Granting pardon for violations of the Selective Service Act, August 4, 1964, to March 28, 1973. archives.gov. Retrieved November 6, 2006.
 11. ^ Hand, Mark (January 3, 2003). "Searching for Daniel Brandt". CounterPunch
 12. ^ McCarthy, Jerry (January-March 1994). Mary Ferrell Profile. NameBase NewsLine, cited on Spartacus Educational
 13. ^ Gerth, Jeff (October 6, 1987). Washington Talk: The Study of Intelligence; Only Spies Can Find These Sources. New York Times
 14. ^ Dedman, Bill (ed.). Power Reporting: Beat by beat: Military. via PowerReporting.com, accessed 19 April 2006.
 15. ^ http://www.namebase.org/unique.html PIR website, "Why is namebase unique?", retrieved 15 April 2006
 16. ^ Dan Brandt, "An Incorrect Political Memoir," Lobster, No. 24 (December 1992); Chip Berlet, "Right Woos Left: Populist Party, LaRouchite, and Other Neo-fascist Overtures To Progressives, And Why They Must Be Rejected", Cambridge, Massachusetts: Political Research Associates, 1991. See Berlet's version of events at Political Research Associates' The Public Eye article Other Right-Wing Groups and the Gulf War (no by-line and no publication date) and Brandt's version of events at Wikipedia Review General Discussion : A general question regarding Brandt and WP: NPA — One rule for one? Published 7 December 2006
 17. ^ Associated Press (March 20, 2002). CIA Caught Sneaking Cookies via CBS News
 18. ^ Aftergood, Steven (March 19, 2002). CIA cookies exposed and eliminated. Secrecy News
 19. ^ a b Manjoo, Farhad (2002-08-29). Meet Mr. Anti-Google. Salon.com. Archived from the original on 2005-03-09. See http://www.google-watch.org/gaming.html#case3., Brandt's response
 20. ^ Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (April 19, 2004). Thirty-One Privacy and Civil Liberties Organizations Urge Google to Suspend Gmail. via privacyrights.org
 21. ^ Alexa traffic details.
 22. ^ http://www.wikipedia-watch.org/findchat.html - Wikipedia-Watch: The Wikipedia Hive Mind Chat Room]
 23. ^ http://www.wikipedia-watch.org/psamples.html - Wikipedia-Watch: Plagiarism by Wikipedia Editors]
 24. ^ See the spam blacklist for a current listing of sites.The relevant policy prohibits automated insertion of links by bots, as well as widespread placement of marginally relevant links. See Wikipedia:Spam#External link spamming
 25. ^ Public Information Research. http://wikipedia-watch.org - Wikipedia Watch, Retrieved on April 2006
 26. ^ http://www.wikipedia-watch.org/hivemind.html - Wikipedia-Watch:The Wikipedia Hive Mind
 27. ^ DeFoore, Jay (2005-12-01). Wikipedia Founder, Readers Respond to Seigenthaler Article. Editor & Publisher. Membership required.
 28. ^ http://www.wikipedia-watch.org/wikitort.html - Wikipedia-Watch: Can You Sue Wikipedia?]
 29. ^ Jesdanun, Anick (November 3, 2006). Wikipedia Critic Finds Copied Passages. Associated Press.
 30. ^ Seigenthaler, John Sr. (2005-11-29). A False Wikipedia 'biography'. USA Today.
 31. ^ Terdiman, Daniel (2005-12-15). In search of the Wikipedia prankster. CNET News.com.

December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The San Antonio Express-News is the daily circulatory newspaper of San Antonio, Texas. ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... December 30 is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 1 day remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ali Velshi is a television journalist best known for his work on CNN. Born in Kenya and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, he is the son of Murad Velshi, a business owner first in Africa and then in Canada. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the CNN news program. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is an international newspaper published daily, Monday through Friday. ... Katharine Q. Seelye is a political reporter for the New York Times. ... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (279th in Leap years). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Counterpunch can refer to: In traditional typography, a counterpunch is a type of punch used to create the negative space in or around a character. ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Screenshot of Salon. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... E&P redirects here. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Press photo of Seigenthaler John Lawrence Seigenthaler (pronounced , born July 27, 1927) is an American journalist, writer, and political figure. ... USA Today is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... {{Infobox_Company | company_name = CNET Networks| company_logo = | company_type = [[Publicly traded NASDAQ: CNET foundation = 1993| location = San Francisco, California, USA| key_people = Shelby W. Bonnie, Co-founder, Chairman, and CEO| num_employees = 2,080 (2006)| industry = Internet Information Provider| homepage = [1] ==CNET Networks, Inc. ... Bibliography

   * "Google Libraries and Privacy" by Daniel Brandt, Web Pro News, 1 December 2005
   * "An Incorrect Political Memoir" by Daniel Brandt, Lobster, December 1992

December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... External links Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Daniel Brandt

Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sites run by Daniel Brandt

   * www.cia-on-campus.org - CIA on Campus
   * http://www.google-watch.org - Google Watch
   * http://www.namebase.org - NameBase
   * http://www.scroogle.org - Scroogle
   * http://www.wikipedia-watch.org - Wikipedia Watch

Media coverage

   * "Conspiracy Researcher says Google's no good" by Farhad Manjoo, Salon.com, 30 August 2002 with http://www.google-watch.org/gaming.html#case3 Brandt's response (down the bottom)
   * "Paranoid or Prescient? Daniel Brandt is concerned about Google Print" by Jim Hedger, Concept, 2003
   * "Scraping Google to see what's happening" by John Battelle, Searchblog, 11 January 2005
   * "Anti-Google campaign by Lenz?" by Nathan Weinberg, Blog news Channel, 15 May 2005
   * "What's in a Wiki?" by Philipp Lenssen, Blog News Channel, 30 October 2005
   * "Who owns your Wikipedia bio?" by Andrew Orlowski, The Register, 6 December 2005
   * "Caught red handed" Sydney Morning Herald, 12 December 2005

Persondata NAME Brandt, Daniel Leslie ALTERNATIVE NAMES SHORT DESCRIPTION Activist DATE OF BIRTH 1947 PLACE OF BIRTH China DATE OF DEATH PLACE OF DEATH

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