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Pokémon has 493 (as of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl) distinctive fictional species classified as the titular Pokémon. These creatures and entities reside throughout various locations of the fictional Pokémon universe and can be caught by humans designated as Pokémon Trainers often using devices called Poké Balls. These trainers use Pokémon for a variety of purposes, such as being pets and loyal companions and/or being pitted against other trained Pokémon in competitive Pokémon battles. Pokémon are potentially super-powered creatures that can employ a variety of talents such as generating fire or heat, martial arts, telekinesis, and so on. Through age and experience many of these species undergo a metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger specie in a process referred to as Pokémon evolution.

This is a selected listing of twenty of the Pokémon species, arranged as they are in the main game series' National Pokédex.

BulbasaurEdit

Template:Pokeinfoboxsmall Bulbasaur (フシギダネ?, Fushigidane), known as the Seed Pokémon, are small , squat, vaguely reptilian Pokémon that move on all four legs, and have turquoise bodies with darker blue-green spots, and a green plant bulb on their backs. Bulbasaur also have large red eyes and small sharp teeth. As a Bulbasaur undergoes evolution into Ivysaur and then later into Venusaur, the bulb on its back blossoms into a flower. Its starting attacks are Tackle and Leer. In the Pokémon video game series, the Pokédex says that the seed on a Bulbasaur's back is planted at birth, and then sprouts and grows larger as the Bulbasaur grows.[1] The Pokédex also states that the bulb absorbs sunlight which makes it grow. For this reason, Bulbasaur enjoy soaking up the sun's rays,[2] and can survive for days without eating because the bulb stores energy.[3]

Bulbasaur is a starter Pokémon the player can choose from at the beginning of Pokémon Red and Blue, and their remakes, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. Bulbasaur and the other starters from Red and Blue are replaced by Pikachu in Pokémon Yellow, the only starter available in it. Instead, they are each obtained from certain NPCs. In Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, as a reward from Professor Oak after defeating the final boss, Red, the player can choose from Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle. The Nintendo 64 spin-off Pokémon Stadium, and other spin-offs such as Pokémon Mystery Dungeon, give the player a choice of being a Bulbasaur (among fifteen other Pokémon), and in Pokémon Snap, Bulbasaur are one of the Pokémon that the player can photograph. Bulbasaur also appears in Hey You, Pikachu! as a supporting character who lives in the Ochre Woods and makes the five recipes with Pikachu's help.[4] In Super Smash Bros. Melee, a Bulbasaur appears as one of the trophies in a playable lottery.[5] Bulbasaur also appears as a trophy in the sequel, Super Smash Bros. Brawl.

Scenes from the Pokémon anime have depicted both the characters Ash and May training a Bulbasaur at different times, with Ash's Bulbasaur garnering more prominence within the storylines.[6][7] Ash’s Bulbasaur has remained with Ash longer than all of his other Pokémon, with the exception of his Pikachu. Before joining Ash's team, it lived with a girl named Melanie, who took care of abandoned Pokémon.[8] Bulbasaur was given to Ash, but it was pessimistic about him. However, its loyalties began to improve and it eventually became one of Ash's most faithful Pokémon.[8][9] May catches a Bulbasaur while traveling in a grass-type Pokémon nature reserve during her journey in Hoenn. Bulbasaur defends her from the other grass Pokémon in the forest, who see her as a threat, and when May leaves, Bulbasaur decides to go with her.[10] She later makes a guest appearance on the series and it is revealed that her Bulbasaur has fully evolved into a Venusaur.[11] In Pokémon Adventures, a manga based on the plot of the Pokémon Red and Blue games, the character Red receives a Bulbasaur from Professor Oak, which he nicknames Saur.[12] In Chapter 15, "Wartortle Wars", it evolves into an Ivysaur after battling a wild Mankey.[13]

Bulbasaur has been featured in varying pieces of merchandise, including toys and plush dolls.[14] Bulbasaur has been depicted in action figures sold by Hasbro in the United States, while Tomy in Japan sold extensive merchandise of the character, including vinyl dolls, wind-up model kits, and terry cloth bean bags.[15] It has also been used in promotional merchandising at fast-food chains such as McDonald's and Burger King.[16][17] Bulbasaur has also been featured in various versions of the Pokémon painting on ANA Boeing 747s.[18] Jockey Craig Newitt rode a horse name Bulbasaur to a win at the Caulfield Christmas Stakes in 2003.[19] The island nation of Niue issued a commemorative coin with a legal tender value of one crown which has a Bulbasaur on the reverse side.[20] Bulbasaur was the inspiration for a charitable fund-raising drive in Norristown for a children's community center. The majority of the funds raised came from the sale of Pokémon buttons which include Bulbasaur along with other popular Pokémon like Pikachu and Charmander. The successful initiative was covered on television.[21]

A writer for the University of Notre Dame's The Observer noted that Bulbasaur was the third most popular Pokémon to pick after Charizard, who was "was sleek, powerful, and utterly destructive", and Squirtle, who "would evolve into Blastoise, a tank of a turtle with huge water cannons on its back." Next was Bulbasaur, "which would become Venusaur, a clumsy-looking lout with a giant flower growing on its back." He speculated that the people who chose Bulbasaur were ones who "knew how it felt to be picked last in gym class."[22] In an IGN biography page, Bulbasaur is described as "the odd man out" in the Pokémon Red and Blue game, saying "it was the one that wasn’t red or blue. Instead, it’s perhaps the best-known grass-type Pokémon, even though it’s a little bit more animal than vegetable." It continues that "Bulbasaurs are very popular starter monsters for young Pokémon trainers", and details the meaning of its Japanese name Fushigidane.[23] IGN editor "Pokémon of the Day Chick" stated that while Charizard "slightly surpassed" Venusaur in popularity, she called Bulbasuar a "VERY popular choice as far as the starting [sic] of Red and Blue go". She also praised the anime incarnation, citing its attitude.[24] GamesRadar editor Brett Elston described Bulbasaur as being popular for more than just being the first Pokémon numerically, citing its moveset and evolutions.[14] Fellow GamesRadar editor Carolyn Gudmundson, in an article on the "top 7 gut-wrenching choices", listed the choice between fire, grass, or water. She states that Bulbasaur was a frontrunner, due to being a dinosaur as well as being grass type. However, she found fault in his evolution, Ivysaur and Venusaur, calling Ivysaur ugly and Venusaur charmless.[25] Bulbasaur was selected as one of the top ten Pokémon by fans who voted at Pokemon.com.[26] According to a panel of 5 - 8 year olds assembled by the Honolulu Star-Bulletin in 1999, Bulbasaur was one of the children's three favorite Pokémon.[27] Developer and director of Pokémon Platinum Takeshi Kawachimaru stated Bulbasaur was his favorite Pokémon.[28]

IvysaurEdit

Template:Pokeinfoboxsmall Ivysaur (フシギソウ?, Fushigisō), known as the Seed Pokémon, is the evolved form of Bulbasaur. Aside from becoming taller and heavier then Bulbasaur, its trademark bulb becomes a pink flower bud, and four leaves now appear at the base of this bud. The Pokémon's legs are more stout, allowing it to hold up the bigger bulb, yet limiting its previous ability to stand on its hind legs.[29] Its eyes now look more aggressive and intimidating. Like before, Ivysaur and its bulb share a mutualistic relationship; bathing in sunlight allows both to continue growing.[30] Eventually, the bud will give off a sweet scent, a signal that it will bloom soon, and that its host will evolve. An Ivysaur will spend more time bathing in sunlight in order to reach evolution.[31]

In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Ivysaur is a playable character, under the command of the Pokémon Trainer.[32] The Trainer also has a Squirtle and a Charizard, all three of which can be switched between; unlike the other fighters, these Pokémon become fatigued and consequently weaker, and must be switched out long enough to recover.[32] In the animated series, Ash Ketchum's Bulbasaur decides not to evolve into an Ivysaur. Ash's friend May, however, has a young female Bulbasaur that evolves into Ivysaur, then into Venusaur. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, the character Red receives a Bulbasaur from Professor Oak, which he nicknames Saur.[33] In Chapter 15, "Wartortle Wars", it evolves into an Ivysaur after battling a wild Mankey.[34] In Chapter 30, "Zap, Zap, Zapdos!", Red uses Saur to defeat Lt. Surge's Zapdos.[35] In Chapter 33, "The Winged Legends", Red's Ivysaur evolves into a Venusaur to team up with Blue's Charizard and Green's Blastoise, to defeat Sabrina's Zapmolcuno (a merged form of Zapdos, Moltres and Articuno) and destroy Team Rocket's control on Saffron City, splitting the three birds in the process.[36]

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston called Ivysaur the "middle child" of the Bulbasaur evolutionary line, due to it not being as cute as Bulbasaur, yet not as intimidating as Venusaur. However, he described him as a necessary step in the line.[37]

VenusaurEdit

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Venusaur (フシギバナ?, Fushigibana), known as the Seed Pokémon, is the final stage in Bulbasaur evolution. The seed finally bloomed into a huge flower, vaguely resembling a Rafflesia. The flower constantly draws in sunlight for nutrition, characterized by vivid colors and a soothing aroma, and power, which is much more substantial in the summer.[38][39] They are always on the move to absorb more sunlight, though they usually remain quiet and still while absorbing it.[40] After it rains, the aroma is much stronger, which attracts other Pokémon.[41] Female Venusaur have a seed coming out of the flower, possibly representing a pregnancy. Being the final form of Grass starter, Venusaur can learn moves such as Hyper Beam, Giga Impact and Frenzy Plant.

Venusaur appears in Super Smash Brothers as a random Pokémon on the "Saffron City" stage. It uses Razor Leaf to hurt opponents. Venusaur also appears in Super Smash Bros. Melee as a PokéBall Pokémon. When summoned, it uses Earthquake, repeatedly slams the ground with its body, damaging any nearby foes. In Hey You, Pikachu!, Venusaur lives in the Cobalt Coast as a supporting character who looks forward to the Pinata party. Venusaur is the version mascot of both Pokémon Green and LeafGreen versions, appearing on the boxart of both.

Venusaur has appeared several times in the anime. A wild one was leading an evolution ceremony for Bulbasaur in Kanto, while another was the ruler of a forest in Hoenn where grass Pokémon lived. May also had a Bulbasaur that evolved into a Venusaur. Besides, Venusaur has been owned by Drake of the Orange Crew, an artist called Gan Gogh, Noland the Factory Head and Spencer the Palace Maven of the Battle Frontier and a business man/guitarist called Jeremy. May also has a Venusaur in which she used to compete in contests. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, the character Red receives a Bulbasaur from Professor Oak, which he nicknames Saur.[33] It ultimately evolves into an Ivysaur,[34] and In Chapter 33, "The Winged Legends", Red's Ivysaur evolves into a Venusaur to team up with Blue's Charizard and Green's Blastoise, to defeat Sabrina's Zapmolcuno (a merged form of Zapdos, Moltres and Articuno) and destroy Team Rocket's control on Saffron City, splitting the three birds in the process.[36]

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston cited Venusaur as the first final evolution, establishing how Pokémon go from being cute to becoming an "unsightly beast".[42]

CharmanderEdit

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Charmander (ヒトカゲ?, Hitokage), is known as the Lizard Pokémon. Charmander are small, bipedal lizard-like Pokémon. Most have blue eyes, red-orange skin, three-clawed toes, yellow bellies, and yellow soles under its feet. The end of a Charmander's tail is alight with a flame, and the flame's size reflects both the physical health[43] and the emotions of the individual.[44] When it rains, steam is said to spout from the tip of its tail.[45] If the flame were to ever go out, the Charmander would die.[46]

Charmander is a starter Pokémon the player can choose from at the beginning of Pokémon Red and Blue, and their remakes, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. Charmander and the other starters from Red and Blue are replaced by Pikachu in Pokémon Yellow, the only starter available in it. Instead, they are each obtained from certain NPCs. In Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, as a reward from Professor Oak after defeating the final boss, Red, the player can choose from Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle. A stage in Super Smash Bros. called "Saffron City" features an area where various Pokémon pop out to attack players; one such Pokémon is a Charmander that sometimes uses Flamethrower.

In the anime, Ash acquires a Charmander early in the series. Ash's Charmander originally belonged to a trainer named Damien, who believed it was weak, and cruelly abandoned it, telling it to stay in one spot until he "returned". Sadly, the Pokémon was very loyal to its Trainer, and risked its life waiting for a Trainer who'd never come back to it. Ash, Brock, and Misty had to rush it to a Pokémon Center to keep it alive. Upon seeing Damien's true colors, Charmander joined Ash, but upon evolving into Charmeleon, it became willful and difficult to control. Charmander is also a male protagonist of Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Team Go-Getters Out Of The Gate!. Along with a female Chikorita, he works alongside a young boy who transformed into a Squirtle in helping fellow Pokémon. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Blue receives a Charmander from his grandfather Professor Oak. It is later shown to have evolved into a Charmeleon.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston stated that while it lacks the nuances of later similar starting Pokémon, it has "cutesy appeal" to it.[47]

CharmeleonEdit

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Charmeleon (リザード Rizādo?, Lizardo), known as the Flame Pokémon, are bipedal lizard Pokémon, that have yellow bellies and soles, three clawed feet and hands, and bear a flame at the end of their tails. They are darker-skinned than Charmander, now possess a bumpy horn on their heads, and take on a more intimidating appearance. Indeed, Charmeleon are excessively savage and short-tempered by nature,[48] and they are powerful fighters due to their temperament. The flame on its tail may burn a bluish white when the Pokémon is excited,[49] and the air temperature often raises to very high levels when the tail flame is waved around.[50]

In the animated series, Ash Ketchum's Charmander evolved into a Charmeleon after stopping a stampede of Exeggutor. Afterwards, its behavior took a turn for the worse, as it now ignored Ash's commands, as well as using Flamethrower on him many times. It soon evolved into a Charizard during a fight with an Aerodactyl, in order to keep up with the winged foe (not so much to save the Pokémon's captive, Ash). The evolution did not improve Charizard's behavior in any way, and Ash struggled for some time to get the Pokémon to listen to him once more. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Blue receives a Charmander from his grandfather Professor Oak. It evolves into a Charmeleon, and when Blue is possessed by a Gastly in the Lavender Tower, so is Charmeleon. Blue's Charmeleon is eventually released from its possession only to be faced down by an Arbok, owned by Koga. Charmeleon tricked Koga by using a zombie Psyduck to deflect Arbok's acid attack before literally slicing the Arbok in half with his tail. Blue later appears with an evolved Charizard and gains access to Saffron City by helping to disable a barrier created by a Mr. Mime.[51]

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston compared Charmeleon to Ivysaur in how they both lack the cutesy appeal of their previous forms, but are not as intimidating as their next forms.[52]

CharizardEdit

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Main article: Charizard

Charizard (リザードン Rizādon?, Lizardon), known as the Flame Pokémon, is the final stage in Charmander evolution. Its name seems to be a portmanteau of the words "char" and "lizard". Where as Charmander and Charmeleon are ground-bound lizard like creatures, Charizard resembles a large traditional European dragon. Despite this, Charizard is explicitly a Fire/Flying-type, not a Dragon-type.[53] This Pokémon is on the cover art for the boxes of Pokémon Red, FireRed, and many other side games. During an interview, Pokémon Company president Tsunekazu Ishihara stated Charizard was expected to be popular with North American audiences, citing their preference for strong, powerful characters.[54]

Charizard have two wings that are blue on the front, while the back is orange like the most of its body. Its belly ands soles however are cream-colored. Although hardly visible, Charizard's eyes are light blue in color. It uses its three-clawed feet more than it uses its own hands. Its wings can carry this Pokémon close to an altitude of 4,600 feet.[55] It breathes intense flames that can melt any material. However, it will never torch a weaker foe.[56] One is also capable of crushing enemies with its claws. Charizard are violent yet honorable creatures, flying proudly around the sky and constantly seeking for powerful opponents to quarrel with.[57] If Charizard becomes furious, the flame at the tip of its tail flares up in a whitish-blue color.[58] Because of their reckless behavior, Charizard are also known to unintentionally cause wildfires.[59] Charizard is 5 ft and 7 inches long and weighs 199.5 Lb. There is a rare shiny Charizard, which is Pitch-Black.

SquirtleEdit

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Squirtle (ゼニガメ?, Zenigame), known as the Tiny Turtle Pokémon, are cute-looking turtle Pokémon, capable of moving either on two feet or on all fours. Their skin is a light blue, and they possess a long, curled tail. When feeling threatened, Squirtle withdraw their limbs into their brown-orange shells and spray water from their mouth with great force, either to attack their opponent or merely to intimidate it.[60] If attacked anyway, their shells are extremely resilient, and provide excellent protection. It shelters itself in its shell, then strikes back with spouts of water at every opportunity.[61] Squirtle's shell is not merely used for protection. The shell's rounded shape and the grooves on its surface help minimize resistance in water, enabling this Pokémon to swim at high speeds.[62]

Squirtle is a starter Pokémon the player can choose from at the beginning of Pokémon Red and Blue, and their remakes, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. Squirtle and the other starters from Red and Blue are replaced by Pikachu in Pokémon Yellow, the only starter available in it. Instead, they are each obtained from certain NPCs. In Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, as a reward from Professor Oak after defeating the final boss, Red, the player can choose from Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle. Aside from the main games, Squirtle appears in Super Smash Bros. Melee as one of many Pokémon balloon floats in the stage Pokéfloats; it is the first Pokéfloat to appear. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Squirtle is now playable, under the command of the Pokémon Trainer.[32] The Trainer also has a Ivysaur and a Charizard, all three of which can be switched between; unlike the other fighters, these Pokémon become fatigued and consequently weaker, and must be switched out long enough to recover.[32]

In the animated series, Ash Ketchum, Brock, and Misty encounter a gang of five Squirtle known as the Squirtle Squad. They first appear as delinquents, but their interactions with Ash and Co. result in them becoming honorary firefighters of their town. The leader of the gang, however, chooses to go with Ash and battle for him; throughout Ash's journey through the Kanto region, it is an invaluable member of Ash's team, and proves its strength without ever evolving. Eventually, the Squirtle parts ways with Ash in order to lead its old gang, suffering a lack of proper guidance. Despite returning to its hometown, Squirtle will happily aid Ash whenever he requests it. Ash's second female companion, May received her own Squirtle from Professor Oak. May's Squirtle was very young and timid until evolving, despite being recently born, it quickly grows accustomed to the Pokémon Contests May participates in, even helping May win some, earning Ribbons as rewards. After May leaves Ash's group, she temporarily reunites with him in Sinnoh, revealing that many of her Pokémon had now evolved; Squirtle has since evolved into Wartortle. Eric Stuart does the voice of Squirtle up until late in Ash's Hoenn adventure; Michelle Knotz takes over his role afterwards.

Squirtle is also the protagonist of Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Team Go-Getters Out Of The Gate!; this Squirtle actually happens to be a young boy, transformed and sent to a world completely inhabited by Pokémon. Green, the original female protagonist in the Pokémon Adventures, stole a Squirtle from Professor Oak's laboratory. It was not seen until Chapter 15, "Wartortle Wars", by which point it had evolved into a Wartortle, nicknamed Turtley, which she used to try and escape from another trainer, Red, chasing her.[63] In the Pokémon: Pikachu Shocks Back manga, when Pikachu is separated from Ash temporarily it meets a cynical Squirtle, who believes Ash has abandoned Pikachu. Later, Ash has caught a Squirtle of his own, which accompanies Ash thought his journeys in the Orange Islands.

Squirtle appears as a recurring character in the Super Effective webcomic produced by VG Cats creator Scott Ramsoomair; in one comic, he is depicted as self-conscious after his owner Blue implies that he is fat, resulting in him forcing himself to throw up and using Water Gun.[64] According to Time magazine, Squirtle was considered one of the “more popular” in the original series.[65] Boys' Life named Squirtle one of the five "coolest" Pokémon from Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, placing second on their list.[66] IGN stated "[l]eave it to Nintendo to have a cute turtle", further calling it cuter than the Mario series Koopa Troopas.[67] GamesRadar editor Brett Elston stated that while Charizard and Bulbasaur get "big props" from players of the series, people not affiliated with the series as well give it the "popular nod".[68]

WartortleEdit

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Wartortle (カメール Kamēru?, Kameil), known as the Turtle Pokémon, is the evolved form of Squirtle. It has a slightly more intimidating appearance; aside from an increased height and weight, it now has darker skin, possesses meaner eyes with smaller pupils, and bears two small outer fangs. Its shell may receive battle scars, from battles that these Pokémon more willingly seek out.[69] A Wartortle also gets a pair of feathery ears, and its tail becomes white, fluffy, and too long to completely hide within its shell;[70] these appendages greatly aid this Pokémon in swimming, acting as oars and/or fins.[71] The tail also happens to be a highly valued collectors' item, which has caused people to hunt this Pokémon, dwindling their numbers. The reason for such poaching may very well be that a Wartortle tail is a symbol of longevity in the Pokémon world, supposedly allowing the creature to live for thousands of years.[72]

In the anime, the first appearance of a Wartortle is when a wild one runs into Ash Ketchum and his friends on Cinnabar Island, seeking help for its clan of Squirtle, Wartortle, and a leading Blastoise, all mysteriously stricken with sleepiness.[73] More Wartortle appear as firefighting Pokémon, and Ash's Squirtle, being an honorary firefighter of its hometown, forms a rivalry with the leader. Finally, another of Ash's traveling companions, May received her own Squirtle from Professor Oak in The Right Place and the Right Mime. May's Squirtle was very young and timid, until evolving before Staging a Heroes Welcome . In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Green had a Wartortle, which had evolved from a Squirtle she stole from Professor Oak. Just like Green, it also has a tricky personality. It has since evolved into Blastoise.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston compared it to Ivysaur and Charmeleon, describing it as a pit stop to a more powerful Pokémon.[74]

BlastoiseEdit

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Blastoise (カメックス Kamekkusu?, Kamex), known as the Shellfish Pokémon, is the final stage in Squirtle evolution. It takes on an appearance radically different from its previous forms; the most obvious change is the addition of two retractable cannons on its shell. It is also a girthier and more imposing figure: the shape of its head is completely reformed; its limbs are now stout and segmented, bearing visible claws; and its once sought-after tail is short and somewhat stubby. The afore-mentioned cannon spouts are remarkable adaptations, allowing a Blastoise to shoot water with great power and accuracy. The jets of water it spouts from the rocket cannons on its shell can punch through thick steel,[75] while their bullets of water can precisely nail tin cans from a distance of over 160 feet.[76] The spouts also allow for high-speed tackles.[77] Despite being large and heavy, Blastoise can still move well on either two legs or all fours. Blastoise can be found living on island beaches near the ocean, but their preferred habitat seems to be freshwater ponds and lakes.

In the video games, Blastoise are only obtainable within the game by evolving a Squirtle. Blastoise helped introduce the world to the original 151 species of Pokémon by being featured on the box art of Pokémon Blue and Pokémon Stadium. Blastoise also appears in Super Smash Bros and Super Smash Bros Melee as one of many Pokémon that a fighter can send out after throwing a Poké Ball. When released from a Poké Ball, Blastoise will use Hydro Pump in one direction. Each Pump moves Blastoise backwards, slightly making it a danger to those fighting behind it as well (the Blastoise risks falling off the stage, however).

A handful of trainers in the Anime series have owned Blastoise, notably Gary Oak who raised one from a Squirtle.[78] While the initial appearance of Blastoise was in a first season episode about an island filled with giant robot Pokémon,[79] the first real Blastoise made its debut in Beach Blank-Out Blastoise, an episode where a Jigglypuff had become lodged in one of the Blastoise's cannons, causing the latter to sleep indefinitely.[73] Blastoise also received some screen time in the first Pokémon movie, Mewtwo Strikes Back, as a Pokémon nicknamed Shellshocker, owned by one of the major supporting characters, Neesha.[80] Blastoise are also owned by Cissy, a member of the Orange Crew;[81] and Brock’s mother Lola.[82]

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Green stole a Squirtle from Prof. Oak's Lab. This Squirtle ultimately becomes a Blastoise, nicknamed Blasty, with a tricky personality like its owner, and becomes the major powerhouse on Green's team.[83] it also provided a quick route of aerial transport by withdrawing its limbs into its shell, and blasting water out from its cannons to propel itself forward. Green lent Blasty to Red to assist his journey on Mt. Silver. Blasty inherited the ultimate water attack, Hydro Cannon, directly from Kimberly, without requiring the Jump Path, Catch Path, and Battle Path to master the skills.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston compared Blastoise to Charizard, stating that while Charizard plays the "safe route" in being a dragon, Blastoise takes a more unique form by being a giant turtle with water cannons coming out of its shell.[84]

CaterpieEdit

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Main article: Caterpie

Caterpie (キャタピー Kyatapī?), known as the Worm Pokémon, are larval Pokémon found in the wild early in the Kanto and Johto regions. In main series Pokémon games set in these regions, Caterpie are among the earliest and easiest Pokémon species caught by players, as they are very weak. They can be evolved into their cocoon-like Metapod form and eventually into the butterfly-like Butterfree form. Caterpie resembles a green caterpillar with yellow ring-shaped markings down its body. Its most notable characteristic is the bright orange antennae on its head. These and the large eye-shaped markings help to startle predators. Their green bodies are useful for camouflage in foliage,[85] their eyes are patterned to scare away predators,[86] their suction-cup feet allow them to climb any surface,[87] and the osmeterium on their heads can project a horrid stench to repel predators.[88] It bears a resemblance to the spicebush swallowtail caterpillar.

MetapodEdit

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Metapod (トランセル Toranseru?, Trancell), known as the Cocoon Pokémon, are pupal Pokémon found in the wild early in the Kanto and Johto regions, of which its larval form is the caterpillar-like Caterpie. They can evolve into the butterfly-like Butterfree. While Metapod is classified as a cocoon Pokémon, it bears more resemblance to a chrysalis. A Metapod's exterior is regularly hardened to protect its soft and tender innards while undergoing metamorphosis to eventually become a Butterfree.[89] To conserve energy for this event, the Metapod barely moves.[90] While this shell is said to be as hard as steel, a large sudden impact could cause its vulnerable body to pop out, leaving it completely exposed.[91]

In the anime, Ash Ketchum owned a Metapod that evolved from a Caterpie when Ash sent it out, and it took down both James's Koffing and Jessie's Ekans by himself using String Shot and Tackle.[92] Metapod was first sent out in a battle against Samurai, and managed to defeat his Pinsir despite only being able to use Harden. Samurai decided to send his own Metapod out against Ash's; neither could attack, and both had to sit stationary and keep hardening. This was interrupted by a swarm of Beedrill that snatched Ash's Metapod away when he forgot to pick it up before running off. Ash found it with a hive of Kakuna. Metapod, seeing a Beedrill about to attack Ash, leapt up and took the blow, breaking the Beedrill's stinger and getting a large gash in its shell. Metapod then evolved into Butterfree and stopped all the Beedrill with a Sleep Powder attack.[93]

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Metapod's first appearance is a cameo as one of the Pokémon that escapes from Professor Oak's Laboratory. Yellow had a Caterpie named Kitty, which she did not want to evolve. However, in the battle against Lance, she did not have her Pokédex, which she needed to stop her Pokémon from evolving, and so Caterpie evolved into Metapod and then into Butterfree right afterwards. Bugsy also uses two Metapod on his team.

GamesRadar described Caterpie's evolution, Metapod, as a punching bag.[94]

ButterfreeEdit

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Butterfree (バタフリー Batafurī?), known as the Butterfly Pokémon, are fully-developed, butterfly-like Pokémon that have hatched from their pupal Metapod forms. Whereas many other Pokémon evolve into their final forms at much later levels, Butterfree's early availability makes it a temporarily strong asset to Pokémon Trainers starting out on their journeys. Butterfree resembles a vaguely anthropomorphic butterfly. Unlike true insects, it only has four legs, which are a pale blue color. It has a nose-like structure which is a similar color. Its body’s coloration is a darker purple-blue. It has large veined wings which are white with black markings. These markings can help distinguish male and female individuals. It has large compound eyes which tend to be a reddish color. Butterfree feed on honey from flowers, and they rub the honey onto the hairs on their legs to transport the honey back to their nests.[95] Like members of the order Lepidoptera, Butterfree’s wings are covered in fine scales that are water-repellant and allow it to fly in heavy rains,[96] something many other insect Pokémon such as Masquerain cannot do, and Butterfree wings are coated in toxic dust that can be shot at an opponent in battle through wing flapping.[97]

In the anime, Ash Ketchum owned a Butterfree that evolved from a Metapod when it was saved by Ash, and then evolved into Butterfree and stopped Beedrill with a Sleep Powder attack.[93] While it was with him, Butterfree was a close companion of Ash's who fought in many battles, including its battle against Misty at the Cerulean Gym. It was notable for its courage, willingly taking on any foe and often proving itself to be much stronger than expected. Ash used it in a battle against a Gentleman with a Raticate, who afterwards asked to trade the Pokémon. Ash accepted, but found that Butterfree meant too much to him to keep the Raticate, and was so set on trading them back that he did it while the St. Anne was sinking, causing him and his friends to be trapped inside.[98] In a later episode, Ash saw a large number of Butterfree flying around in the sky, and Brock told him that it was the Butterfree mating season. Butterfree found its heart set on a pink Butterfree, and tried to impress the pink Butterfree twice, only to be rejected with a slap to the face. After an encounter with Team Rocket, the pink Butterfree approached Ash's Butterfree and the two paired up, and departed.[99]

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Yellow has a Butterfree which evolved from a Caterpie she befriended and captured. Her uncle, Fisherman Wilton, also has a Butterfree. Both of them are able to use Butterfree as a mode of flight, using Butterfree to hold onto their backs as they fly. In The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Ash's Butterfree evolved from Metapod at the Cerulean Gym.

Butterfree has received similarly mixed reception. IGN editor Pokémon of the Day Chick likened it as a counterpart to Beedrill, describing it as an introduction to basic evolution for new players, but its usefulness diminish once it goes up against stronger Pokémon.[100] While GamesRadar editor Brett Elston states that while the staff has said some harsh words about Butterfree, it is very useful early in the game and can even be useful up until the end of the game.[101]

WeedleEdit

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Weedle (ビードル Bīdoru?, Beedle), known as the Hairy Bug Pokémon, are larval Pokémon found in the wild early in the Kanto and Johto regions. They are very weak Pokémon that are captured to be evolved into their cocoon-like Kakuna form and eventually into the hornet-like Beedrill form. Weedle have little pink feet and a pink, round nose. Commonly spotted in the forests and grasslands, eating leaves, Weedle are well protected from predators by sharp two-inch barbs on their heads[102] which secrete a strong poison, and another stinger is on each Weedle's rear. Sniffing with its big red proboscis, a Weedle uses its extremely acute sense of smell to find the types of leaves it eats.[103] Often living in forests and grasslands,[104] it eats its weight in leaves every day.[105]

In the anime, Ash Ketchum was very close to catching a Weedle. He used his newly caught Pidgeotto to battle, Weedle was knocked unconscious and when Ash was about to throw his Poké Ball, Samurai came up and asked Ash if he was a trainer from Pallet Town. This distracted Ash from catching the Weedle, so it got away. This same Weedle later warns its kind and together, they try to avenge its near capture by attacking Ash and company. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Weedle's first appearance is a cameo as one of the Pokémon that escapes from Professor Oak's Laboratory. Also, Green caught a Weedle to try to use to trick people into trading better Pokémon for it at the Pokémon League tournament.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston likened Weedle to Caterpie, stating that he has the advantage of having Poison Sting instead of Tackle.[106]

KakunaEdit

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Kakuna (コクーン Kokūn?, Cocoon), known as the Cocoon Pokémon, are pupal Pokémon found in the wild early in the Kanto and Johto regions, of which its larval form is the worm-like Weedle. They can evolve into the hornet-like Beedrill. Kakuna is a yellow, cone-shaped cocoon Pokémon. Kakuna has a dome-shaped head and black, triangular eyes. Within the shell, a Kakuna busily prepares itself for evolution into its adult form, and the amount of energy released by this process makes the shell quite hot to the touch.[107] In the wild, Kakuna are often found near or on trees, and because their range of motion is extremely limited, they may be mistaken for dead. Carelessly approaching a Kakuna in this state would be extremely unwise because it can still extend the barb of its poisonous stinger to protect itself from threats.[108]

In the anime, Kakuna usually appears in forests where they hatch into Beedrill and swarm at either Ash or Team Rocket. When Ash's Metapod was captured by Beedrill, it was kept near a hive of Kakuna. Kakuna's first appearance in the Pokémon Adventures manga is as one of the Pokémon that escapes from Professor Oak's Laboratory. Bugsy uses two Kakuna on his team.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston described Kakuna as a punching bag similarly to Metapod, and that it could only brace for incoming blows.[109]

BeedrillEdit

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Beedrill (スピアー Supiā?, Spear), known as the Poison Bee Pokémon, are fully-developed, hornet-like Pokémon that have hatched from their pupal Kakuna forms. Although they are hornet-like, they only have four legs. The first two are tipped with long stingers. It has veined wings, and another stinger on its abdomen in which it holds its most powerful poison.[110] Beedrill are extremely territorial, and will be set off by anything that approaches a Beedrill nest.[111] When angered, Beedrill attack in a furious swarm, and the sharp ends of their stingers and the poison stored in their abdomens will definitely be put to use.[112]

In main series Pokémon games, whereas many other Pokémon evolve into their final forms at much later levels, Beedrill's early availability makes it a temporarily strong asset to Pokémon Trainers starting out on their journeys. Beedrill appears in Super Smash Bros. when the player uses a Poké Ball. One would come out and fly away, and a few seconds later a whole swarm would fly by and attack everyone on the field except the user. It did not appear again in Super Smash Bros. Melee and its role was taken over by Unown.

Beedrill's first main appearance in the anime was in Challenge of the Samurai, where a swarm of them stole Ash's Metapod after evolving from Kakuna. In The Bug Stops Here, Ash captured a Beedrill in a Bug-Catching Contest, but he gave it to Casey because she is a huge fan of yellow and black Pokémon. Jimmy of New Bark Town owns a Beedrill which was seen in The Legend of Thunder!. Beedrill has appeared in a lot of episodes, mostly having an antagonistic role to Ash and co. who are usually attacked by a swarm of Beedrill and end up running away.

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, one of Giovanni's most treasured and strongest team members is a Beedrill he caught in his childhood from Viridian Forest. It is also one of the few members of his team that isn't a Ground-type. In The Electric Tale of Pikachu manga, Ash caught a Beedrill that was part of a swarm that he had disturbed when he caught a Mankey. He thought this Beedrill, along with Mankey, would help him to raise his Trainer level, but it couldn't.

Boys' Life named Beedrill one of the five "coolest" Pokémon from Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, placing third on their list.[66] IGN described it as "somewhat cool", though noted its usefulness as limited.[113] GamesRadar editor Brett Elston compared Beedrill to Butterfree in how they are both intended on evolving quickly for beginning players, though Beedrill's moves having more emphasis on doing damage. Like Butterfree, he also states that Beedrill will be benched for more powerful Pokémon.[114]

PidgeyEdit

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Pidgey (ポッポ?, Poppo), known as the Tiny Bird Pokémon, were originally named “Pidge” in the English beta version of Pokémon Red and Blue. Pidgey resembles a small, plump-bodied bird. It is a brown color, with a lighter colored throat and belly. The tips of its wings share this cream color. Both its feet and beak are a pinkish-gray color. Its plumage is fairly nondescript, particularly compared to its evolutions Pidgeotto and Pidgeot. It has black markings around its eyes and a small crest of brown and cream feathers above its eyes. Pidgey are docile and prefer to avoid conflict. If disturbed, however, it can ferociously strike back[115] and will use its wings to stir up clouds of sand in an attempt to distract its would-be opponent and escape.[40] Pidgey also uses this technique to bring its preferred prey of small insects into the open.[116] Pidgey seems to possess magnetoception, as it is capable of returning to its nest from any location without fail.[117]

Pidgey appeared in the first television episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!, when the main character, Ash Ketchum, attempts to catch one. He fails when it uses its Gust attack to blow him away and escapes. Afterwards, it uses its Sand Attack to blind Ash, allowing it to get away.[118] Pidgey are frequently seen in the background of many episodes flying in packs of ten or more. Sometimes they may appear in town centers or fields nearby to Ash and co. and usually fly away due to any local disturbance. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Pidgey makes a couple of cameos as one of the Pokémon that escapes from Professor Oak's Laboratory and when a frozen Pidgey is pictured by Bill in his explanation about how to stop a flying Pokémon. Also, the Safari Zone's tour guide is an automated robotic Pidgey.

IGN described Pidgey as a common Pokémon, and one that any player of the original titles should have caught at one point or another.[119] GamesRadar editor Brett Elston attributed its popularity to being commonly seen in the anime as well as being a solid Pokémon.[120]

PidgeottoEdit

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Pidgeotto (ピジョン Pijon?, Pigeon), known as the Bird Pokémon, is a larger and stronger form that Pidgey takes when it gains enough experience. It is a large raptor-like bird. While its primary color is brown, its plumage is much more elaborate than its pre-evolution, Pidgey. Its head-crest is much longer than Pidgey's and is a reddish color. The plumage of its tail is also quite colorful, alternating between red and yellow. Other than its ornamental plumage, its basic coloration is similar to Pidgey, with pinkish-gray feet and black markings around its eyes. Pidgeotto is extremely territorial, generally claiming a large area with its nest built in the center. Full of vitality, it constantly patrols its territory, mercilessly attacking intruders. They fly about in circular patterns while hunting, and can spot the movements of their prey on the ground no matter how high they fly.[121] Pidgeotto attacks with its wickedly sharp talons and carries its prey, including Exeggcute and Magikarp, back to its nest from as far as 60 miles away or more.[122]

Pidgeotto was the second Pokémon Ash caught in the beginning of his career. Ash caught Pidgeotto in the same episode as Caterpie was caught.[92] It played a role as one of Ash's main Pokémon. It was frequently used for breaking Team Rocket's Meowth-shaped balloon. It eventually evolved into Pidgeot and left Ash's party to guard other Pidgey and Pidgeotto.[123] In the Pokémon Adventures manga, there is a round where Yellow's Caterpie gets taken by a Pidgeotto, and her Pikachu saved it. Falkner also owns a Pidgeotto. In the The Electric Tale of Pikachu manga, Ash gave his Pidgeotto the name of "Walter".

When comparing Pidgeotto to Fearow, GamesRadar editor Brett Elston stated that while Fearow grew to its maximum much quicker and would be more powerful, Pidgeotto does not peter out as quickly, stating that it is more fun to watch Pokémon grow.[124]

PidgeotEdit

Template:Pokeinfoboxsmall

Pidgeot (ピジョット Pijotto?, Pigeot), known as the Bird Pokémon, is a bird-like Pokémon, whose original name in the English beta version of Pokémon Red and Blue was "Pidgeott", is the fully grown and developed form of the Pidgey species evolution line. Pidgeot is noticeably larger than its pre-evolution. Its plumage tends to be larger and glossier. The feathers on its head-crest are nearly as long as its body, and are yellow and red. Its tail feathers are red colored. Like its previous evolutions, its underbelly is a tan color, and it has black markings around its eyes. With their powerful chest muscles at work, Pidgeot can flap their wings fast enough to whip up gusts of winds to rival tornadoes.[125] Pidgeot are very aerodynamic, capable of soaring to an altitude of 3300 feet[126] and reaching speeds of up to Mach 2.[127] Like Pidgeotto, Pidgeot feed on Magikarp by swooping from the sky and snatching them out of the water with their talons.[126] Pidgeot appear very similar to Pidgeotto, so much so that one has been easily mistaken for the other, even by official sources.[128]

In the Pokémon anime, Ash's Pidgeotto evolves into a Pidgeot near the end of the Kanto saga, and remained in Pallet Town to watch over a flock of Pidgey and Pidgeotto while Ash went off to the Orange Islands.[123]

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston stated that it was hard to recommend Pidgeot over Fearow and Staraptor, the former growing to a similar strength much faster while the latter has a better moveset. However, he praises it for its ability to learn several moves after Pidgey reaches its final form.[129]

RatattaEdit

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Ratatta (コラッタ?, Koratta), known as the Mouse Pokémon, are a basic Pokémon species found very commonly in the wild in the Kanto and Johto regions of the Pokémon world. Ratatta resemble small purple rats with large red eyes, cream bellies and paw soles and square fangs. They walk on four legs. Ratatta are among the earliest Pokémon that can be caught by players, so much so that it is said that the presence of one Ratatta indicates the presence of more than forty Ratatta in the area.[130] They make their nests almost anywhere[131] and as extreme omnivores eat anything they can scavenge.[132] A Ratatta's fangs grow continuously throughout its lifespan, so it whittles them down to a comfortable size by gnawing on hard objects.[133] They are best known for their Quick Attack attack, which allows them to strike their enemy first, even if it is not their turn to do so.

Ratatta debuted in the first episode of the series, trying to steal food from Ash's bag. A trainer named A.J. has three Ratatta, that he sent out to look for his missing Sandshrew. Casey also has a Ratatta, whose only appearance was in a battle with Ash. Since then Ratatta has had a few cameo appearances in many different episodes. Ratatta is the sole starting Pokémon in the Wiiware video game Pokémon Rumble. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Ratatta's first appearance is a cameo as one of the Pokémon that escapes from Professor Oak's Laboratory. Ratatta's first main appearance is when Bill is transformed into one in an accident with his Pokémon transporter. A Ratatta is Yellow's first Pokémon (nicknamed "Ratty") that later evolves into a Raticate. Also, Gold has a friend that specializes in training Ratatta, based on the character Youngster Joey, from the games Gold and Silver.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston described Ratatta as a good Pokémon for beginning players. However, he criticized it for its role in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, stating that because it appears late in the game, it lacks usefulness.[134]

RaticateEdit

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Raticate (ラッタ?, Ratta), known as the Mouse Pokémon, is a larger and stronger form that Ratatta takes when it gains enough experience. Raticate resemble large light brown rats with small black eyes, a yellow belly, a large cream coloured tail and the ability to stand on its hind legs. In the main Pokémon game series, a Raticate is only acquired when a Ratatta grows past experience level 20 and is evolved into a Raticate. Compared to a Ratatta, a Raticate is far more of a predator, and the majority of its features are adapted for this purpose. Its whiskers give it balance and it slows down if they are cut off.[135] A female always has shorter whiskers. Its webbed feet allow it to swim as it hunts prey,[136] and its fangs are tough enough to topple concrete buildings by gnawing on them.[137]

On the S.S. Anne, Ash traded his Butterfree for a Raticate but traded back towards the end of the episode. Cassidy has a Raticate that for a time served in her and Butch's motto the role that Meowth serves in the motto of Jessie and James. In Showdown at Dark City, Raticate is one of the Pokémon belonging to one of the Trainers at Kas Gym. Mollie has a Raticate she used during the appeals round of the Gardenia Town contest in What I Did for Love. Butch of Team Rocket used a Raticate in The Ole' Berate and Switch. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, a Ratatta was Yellow's first Pokémon. It later evolved into a Raticate.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston praised Raticate as a great Pokémon early in the game, but criticized it for losing its usefulness later in the game.[138]

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  75. Template:Pokédex
  76. Pokédex: The waterspouts that protrude from its shell are highly accurate. Their bullets of water can precisely nail tin cans from a distance of over 165 feet. Game Freak. 'Pokémon Emerald'. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2005-05-01.
  77. Pokédex: A brutal Pokémon with pressurized water jets on its shell. They are used for high speed tackles. Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. Nintendo. Game Boy. 1998-09-30.
  78. "The Ties That Bind". Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer). Pokémon. Various. September 20, 2003. No. 268, season Master Quest.
  79. "Island of the Giant Pokémon". Takeshi Shudō (writer). Pokémon. Various. September 30, 1998. No. 17, season Indigo League.
  80. "Pokémon: The First Movie". Takeshi Shudo (writer). Pokémon. Various. November 10, 1999.
  81. "Fit to be Tide". Yukiyoshi Ōhashi (writer). Pokémon. Various. February 5, 2000. No. 85, season Adventures on the Orange Islands.
  82. "A Family That Battles Together, Stays Together!". Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer). Pokémon. Various. June 24, 2006. No. 5, season Pokémon Chronicles.
  83. Kusaka, Hidenori; Mato (May 28, 1998). "Chapter 30". Zap! Zap! Zapdos!. Pokémon Adventures. Volume 3: Saffron City Siege. VIZ Media LLC. ISBN 4-09-149333-5. 
  84. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 1, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 9. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-1/a-200708209459101025/g-2006100415372930075/p-9. 
  85. Pokédex: It crawls into foliage where it camouflages itself among leaves that are the same color as its body. Game Freak. 'Pokémon Crystal'. Nintendo. Game Boy Color. 2001-07-29.
  86. Pokédex: It has large, eye-like patterns on its head as protection. They are used to frighten off enemies. Game Freak. 'Pokémon Stadium'. Nintendo. Nintendo 64. 2000-03-06.
  87. Pokédex: Its short feet are tipped with suction pads that enable it to tirelessly climb slopes and walls. Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. Nintendo. Game Boy. 1998-09-30.
  88. Pokédex: For protection, it releases a horrible stench from the antenna on its head to drive away enemies. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  89. Pokédex: It prepares for evolution by hardening its shell as much as possible to protect its soft body. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  90. Pokédex: Inside the shell, it is soft and weak as it prepares to evolve. It stays motionless in the shell. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  91. Pokédex: Hardens its shell to protect itself. However, a large impact may cause it to pop out of its shell. Game Freak. Yellow. Nintendo. Game Boy. 1999-10-19.
  92. 92.0 92.1 "Ash Catches a Pokémon". Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer). Pokémon. Various. September 10, 1998. No. 003, season Indigo League.
  93. 93.0 93.1 "Challenge of the Samurai". Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer). Pokémon. Various. September 11, 1998. No. 004, season Indigo League.
  94. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 1, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 11. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-1/a-200708209459101025/g-2006100415372930075/p-11. 
  95. Pokédex: It collects honey every day. It rubs honey onto the hairs on its legs to carry it back to its nest. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  96. Pokédex: Water-repellent powder on its wings enables it to collect honey, even in the heaviest of rains. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  97. Pokédex: In battle, it flaps its wings at high speeds to release highly toxic dust into the air. Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. Nintendo. Game Boy. 1998-09-30.
  98. "Battle Aboard the St. Anne". Yukiyoshi Ōhashi (writer). Pokémon. Various. September 28, 1998. No. 015, season Indigo League.
  99. "Bye Bye Butterfree". Yukiyoshi Ōhashi (writer). Pokémon. Various. October 5, 1998. No. 021, season Indigo League.
  100. "Pokemon of the Day: Butterfree (#12)". IGN. News Corporation. 17 July 2003. http://faqs.ign.com/articles/429/429293p1.html. Retrieved 1 March 2010. 
  101. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 1. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-2/a-20070820105552651082/g-2006100415372930075. 
  102. Pokédex: It attacks using a two-inch poison barb on its head. It can usually be found under the leaves it eats. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  103. Pokédex: WEEDLE has an extremely acute sense of smell. It is capable of distinguishing its favorite kinds of leaves from those it dislikes just by sniffing with its big red proboscis (nose). Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2003-04-17.
  104. Pokédex: Often found in forests and grasslands. It has a sharp, toxic barb of around two inches on top of its head. Game Freak. Pokémon Leaf Green. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2004-09-09.
  105. Pokédex: It eats its weight in leaves every day. It fends off attackers with the needle on its head. Game Freak. Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Nintendo. Nintendo DS. 2007-04-22.
  106. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 2. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-2/a-20070820105552651082/g-2006100415372930075/p-2. 
  107. Pokédex: It remains virtually immobile while it clings to a tree. However, on the inside, it busily prepares for evolution. This is evident from how hot its shell becomes. Game Freak. 'Pokémon Emerald'. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2005-05-01.
  108. Pokédex: Although it is a cocoon, it can move a little. It can extend its poison barb if it is attacked. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  109. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 3. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-2/a-20070820105552651082/g-2006100415372930075/p-3. 
  110. Pokédex: It has three poison barbs. The barb on its tail secretes the most powerful poison. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  111. Pokédex: Beedrill is extremely territorial. No one should ever approach its nest - this is for their own safety. If angered, they will attack in a furious swarm. Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire. Nintendo. Game Boy Advance. 2003-03-17.
  112. Pokédex: It can take down any opponent with its powerful poison stingers. It sometimes attacks in swarms. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  113. Staff (2002-10-14). "Pokemon of the Day: Beedrill (#15)". IGN. IGN Entertainment. http://faqs.ign.com/articles/374/374278p1.html. Retrieved 2009-10-16. 
  114. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 4. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-2/a-20070820105552651082/g-2006100415372930075/p-4. 
  115. Pokédex: It is docile and prefers to avoid conflict. If disturbed, however, it can ferociously strike back. Game Freak. Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Nintendo. Nintendo DS. 2007-04-22.
  116. Pokédex: It rapidly flaps its wings in the grass, stirring up a dust cloud that drives insect prey out into the open. Game Freak. 'Pokémon Crystal'. Nintendo. Game Boy Color. 2001-07-29.
  117. Pokédex: Pidgey has an extremely sharp sense of direction. It is capable of unerringly returning home to its nest, however far it may be removed from its familiar surroundings. Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire. Nintendo. Game Boy Advance. 2003-03-17.
  118. "Pokémon - I Choose You!". Takeshi Shudō (writer). Pokémon. Various. September 8, 1998. No. 01, season Indigo League.
  119. "Pokémon of the Day". IGN. 1999-11-03. http://gameboy.ign.com/articles/071/071828p1.html. Retrieved 2009-09-29. 
  120. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 5. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-2/a-20070820105552651082/g-2006100415372930075/p-5. 
  121. Pokédex: It has outstanding vision. However high it flies, it is able to distinguish the movements of its prey. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  122. Pokédex: It immobilizes its prey using well-developed claws, then carries the prey more than 60 miles to its nest. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  123. 123.0 123.1 "Pallet Party Panic". Hideki Sonoda (writer). Pokémon. Various. 1999-12-04. No. 78, season 1.
  124. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 6. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-2/a-20070820105552651082/g-2006100415372930075/p-6. 
  125. Pokédex: Its well-developed chest muscles make it strong enough to whip up a gusty windstorm with just a few flaps. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  126. 126.0 126.1 Pokédex: Its outstanding vision allows it to spot Magikarp, even while flying at 3300 feet. Game Freak. 'Pokémon Crystal'. Nintendo. Game Boy Color. 2001-07-29.
  127. Pokédex: It spreads its beautiful wings wide to frighten its enemies. It can fly at Mach 2 speed. Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. Nintendo. Game Boy. 1998-09-30.
  128. Michael Haigney and Kunihiko Yuyama (Directors).. Pokémon: The First Movie. [DVD]. United States: Kids WB!. 
  129. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 7. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-2/a-20070820105552651082/g-2006100415372930075/p-7. 
  130. Pokédex: Will chew on anything with its fangs. If you see one, it is certain that 40 more live in the area. Game Freak. Pokémon Yellow. Nintendo. Game Boy. 1999-10-01.
  131. Pokédex: It eats anything. Wherever food is available, it will settle down and produce offspring continuously. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  132. Pokédex: Bites anything when it attacks. Small and very quick, it is a common sight in many places. Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. Nintendo. Game Boy. 1998-09-30.
  133. Pokédex: Its fangs are long and very sharp. They grow continuously, so it gnaws on hard things to whittle them down. Game Freak. Pokémon FireRed. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2004-09-09.
  134. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 8. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-Pokémon-rby-Pokédex-part-2/a-20070820105552651082/g-2006100415372930075/p-8. 
  135. Pokédex: It uses its whiskers to maintain its balance. It apparently slows down if they are cut off. Game Freak. Pokémon LeafGreen. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2004-09-09.
  136. Pokédex: Its hind feet are webbed. They act as flippers, so it can swim in rivers and hunt for prey. Game Freak. Yellow. Nintendo. Game Boy. 1999-10-19.
  137. Pokédex: Gnaws on anything with its tough fangs. It can even topple concrete buildings by gnawing on them. Game Freak. Gold. Nintendo. Game Boy. 2000-10-15.
  138. Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 9. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-2/a-20070820105552651082/g-2006100415372930075/p-9. 

External linksEdit

Template:Pokémon directory


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