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The Principles of the Logical is a theoretical point of view describing the conceptual scheme by questioning the truthfulness and logicality of propositions. This point of view in philosophy is introduced in the book Philosophy of Logic (1999) by Nijaz Ibrulj, a professor of logic, analytical philosophy, philosophy of language, and cognitive science at the University of Sarajevo. He defines the Principles of the Logical as an ideal matrix of the logical principles or laws of thought (the law of identity, the law of non-contradiction, the law of excluded middle, the law of sufficient reason).[1]

This cognitive matrix is based on a few statements: Each tautology has to be identified or recognized as such in any new statement or any speech act. Each contradiction has to be identified or recognized as a contradiction. Any proposition is based on some concept of identity: tautology is based on meaningful synonymy and contradiction is based on meaningless homonymy. The process of identification or recognition of tautology and contradiction is intuitive computing with words and its meanings based on experience.

As the things of the external world have to be capable of identification (cognition) in a sequence of the spatial-temporal framework, and have to be capable of re-identification (re-cognition) in some other sequences of that same framework, so the Logical has to be capable of identification in a logico-gramatical expression (sentence, context, theory) and of re-identification in some other context which has the same structure. [2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. Ibrulj, Nijaz Philosophy of Logic ISBN 9958-21-112-2 (1999), p. 29
  2. Ibrulj, Nijaz Philosophy of Logic ISBN 9958-21-112-2 (1999), pp. 187-226

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